A wine bar in Lancaster is being prosecuted after a student has had to have her stomach removed after she was served liquid nitrogen.

Gaby Scanlon, a native of Heysham in Lancashire was celebrating her birthday at Oscar’s Wine Bar in Lancaster in October 2012. After she drank 2 Nitro Jagermeisters, she said she felt like her stomach started to expand; an accurate deduction on her part. Miss Scanlon was rushed to Lancaster Royal Infirmary where a scan revealed she had a large perforation of her stomach; meaning a hole in the stomach lining. Perforations can lead to some of the stomach acid leaking into the blood stream or the surrounding tissue leading to much larger issues.

The student, Miss Scanlon, was forced to remain in hospital for 3 weeks whilst the doctors were forced to remove her stomach and connect her oesophagus to her small bowel. The Lancaster City Council has issued a statement saying that actions will be taken against George Street wine bar, one of its directors and an employee.

The full statement issued stating the charges and people states, “Andrew Dunn, of The Garden Village in Old Earswick, Yorkshire, has been summoned to court to answer charges under sections 3(1), 33(1)(a) and 37 of the Health and Safety at Work Act etc 1974 in relation to his role as a director of Oscar’s Wine Bar.” They also called, Matthew George Harding, of George Street in Lancaster,” on slightly different charges these included, “charges under and breaches of sections 7 and 33(1)(a) of the Health and Safety at Work Act etc 1974 in relation to his role as an employee of Oscar’s Wine Bar.”

The company was also held responsible with the statement saying, “The company, Oscar’s Wine Bar Ltd, registered address of 39-42 Bridge Street, Swinton, South Yorkshire, has been summoned to court to answer charges under sections 3(1), and 33(1)(a) of the Health and Safety at Work Act etc 1974.”

The proceedings will take place at Lancaster Magistrates’ Court on 9 February. This latest case shows how dangerous liquid nitrogen can be if mixed into drinks incorrectly but even if you happen to be trained correctly with a substance which can be as volatile as liquid nitrogen it not advised that anyone drink it. One of the issues with using liquid nitrogen is that the purchase is not regulated and the use of it in drinks is also whilst not illegal advised against because of the potential for cases like this to happen. There has also been a call from that David Morris, the MP for Morecambe and Lunesdale, that the sale of drinks containing liquid nitrogen be banned.